Plato – Phaedo

That will do as well, he said. But first let us take care that we avoid a danger.

Of what nature? I said.

Lest we become misologists, he replied, no worse thing can happen to a man than this. For as there are misanthropists or haters of men, there are also misologists or haters of ideas, and both spring from the same cause, which is ignorance of the world. Misanthropy arises out of the too great confidence of inexperience;—you trust a man and think him altogether true and sound and faithful, and then in a little while he turns out to be false and knavish; and then another and another, and when this has happened several times to a man, especially when it happens among those whom he deems to be his own most trusted and familiar friends, and he has often quarreled with them, he at last hates all men, and believes that no one has any good in him at all.

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Plato – Theaetetus

SOCRATES: But how utterly foolish, when we are asking what is knowledge, that the reply should only be, right opinion with knowledge of difference or of anything! And so, Theaetetus, knowledge is neither sensation nor true opinion, nor yet definition and explanation accompanying and added to true opinion?

THEAETETUS: I suppose not

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Aristotle – Metaphysics

It was this belief that blossomed into the most extreme ofthe views above mentioned, that of the professed Heracliteans, such as was held by Cratylus, who finally did not think it right to say anything but only moved his finger, and criticized Heraclitus for saying that it is impossible to step twice into the same river; for he thought one could not do it even once.

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G. B. Kerferd – The Sophistic Movement

” But Greek religion is much richer and less restricted in development. It does not consist in any revealed teachings reconcilable with rational thinking only to a limited degree; it springs rather from a lavish profusion of mythical views of the world, the characteristics of which are constantly changed and revised with each new shift of perspetive.”

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G. B. Kerferd – The Sophistic Movement

“… the things that nourish and benefit human life were the first to be considered gods and to be honoured; the list of such things included the sun, moon, rivers, lakes, springs, the four elements, bread, wine, water fire and so on with each of the things that are useful.”

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